DISTRICT MEETINGS/ELECTIONS

SECO Energy’s service area is divided into nine geographic Districts. Each District is entitled to one Trustee to represent it in Cooperative affairs on the Board. Every year, three District Meetings are held to elect Trustees. In 2022, SECO will hold meetings/elections in Districts 1, 3 and 5. Drive-thru voting is encouraged at each meeting to limit possible COVID exposure and two encourage member participation. For cooperatives that continue to hold District Meetings, Florida Statute requires that members must physically attend a District Meeting to cast a vote for a Trustee candidate. Due to the Statute and SECO’s Bylaws, members currently cannot cast a vote online, by phone or by mail.

 

DISTRICT MEETING AND ELECTION FORMAT

To proactively prepare for social distancing and protect the health of our members and employees, SECO is offering drive-thru voting at all District Meetings. Members who prefer to limit contact with others may register and cast their ballot from their vehicle in a designated drive-thru voting lane at the facility. Members who desire to come inside the facility to register and cast their ballot are encouraged to follow current CDC guidelines. Cookies and giveaways will be provide in the drive-thru voting lanes and through the inside voting process.

DISTRICT MEETING AND ELECTION REQUIREMENTS

The following registration requirements ensure election compliance:

  • Only the person, or the spouse of the person, whose name appears on the official Cooperative records may register to vote at a District Meeting. Members with more than one account may only vote once.
  • Each member or member’s spouse must present identification at the time of registration.
  • Voting by members other than members who are natural persons (e.g. corporations or other entities) shall be allowed upon presentation of satisfactory evidence entitling the person to vote on behalf of the member.
  • Please bring this notice or your SECO bill and photo ID to the meeting. SECO Energy does not endorse any candidate.

 

Registration and voting begin at 4:30 p.m. and the business meeting begins at 6 p.m. See below for specific details for each District Meeting.

 

DISTRICT MEETING LOCATIONS, FORMAT AND ELECTION DATES

 

DISTRICT 1:

 

The Official Notice for the District 1 Meeting mailed December 23. As the incumbent is unopposed, the meeting will be held in a drive-thru only format as in-person voting is required. All participating members who come through the drive-thru will receive a giveaway in a gift bag with cookies and bottled water. After the meeting concludes, a drawing will be held from all registered attendees for twenty-five $25 electric bill credits. Winners will be notified the following week based on their notification preferences set in StormCenter. Since our new CEO Curtis Wynn is unable to address the District 1 member participants in person, he pre-recorded a video update for District 1. Watch for the news release on January 26 for voting results.

 

DISTRICT 5:

 

The Official Notice for the District 5 Meeting mailed December 30. There are five candidates on the ballot for District 5, and this meeting will offer both drive-thru and indoor registration/voting options – in-person voting is required. All registered members (in the drive-thru and in the indoor venue) will receive a giveaway in a gift bag with cookies and bottled water. After the meeting concludes, a drawing will be held from all registered attendees for twenty-five $25 electric bill credits. Winners will be notified the following week based on their notification preferences set in StormCenter. If you’re unable to attend, a video of the business meeting will be posted here along with the news release of the election results.

 

DISTRICT 3:

 

The Official Notice for the District 3 Meeting mailed January 7. Candidate questionnaires will be posted later in the week of January 25. This meeting will offer both drive-thru and indoor registration/voting options – in-person voting is required. All registered members (in the drive-thru and in the indoor venue) will receive a giveaway in a gift bag with cookies and bottled water. After the meeting concludes, a drawing will be held from all registered attendees for twenty-five $25 electric bill credits. Winners will be notified the following week based on their notification preferences set in StormCenter. If you’re unable to attend, a video of the business meeting will be posted here along with the news release of the election results.

Review your District Notice for candidacy information and for dates when candidate profiles will post below.  Not sure what District your service address falls in?  Use our interactive map to determine this by entering the address in the color-coded map below.

CANDIDATE PROFILES

Scott Boyatt

1. What are your qualifications to serve on the SECO Energy Board of Trustees?
I have lived in Clermont for most of my life and have a Bachelor Degree in Electrical Engineering. I have served on the SECO Board for nine years and understand the energy business. I am currently working as a project manager for one of the leading multimillion dollar commercial contracting firm in the United States and know I have a skill set to continue to serve on the board.
2. How long have you been a SECO member and what do you know about the cooperative business model?
I have been a SECO member for 18 years and I have served on SECO Board 9 years. In those nine years I have earned all of the training to be a Gold Certified Cooperative Trustee. My experience and training have taught me that the cooperative business model revolves around its members and that we at SECO must continue to strive to keep our members at the forefront of our vision and decision making.
3. In your opinion, what is the biggest challenge the energy industry will face over the next ten years?
The biggest challenge the energy industry will face over the next ten years is to control cost due to the volatile coal and natural gas prices, along with managing the supply chain for all of the equipment needed to keep up with our continued growth.
4. J.D. Power ranked SECO highest in customer satisfaction in 2015, 2016 and 2017. As a Trustee, how would you ensure continued high satisfaction?
As a member of the SECO Board over the last nine years, I have been part of the decision making that allowed us to achieve the prestigious JD Power Awards. These awards are the direct result of a good leadership team including our CEO and executive management team along with the hard work of 400 dedicated SECO employees.

GeraId (Jerry) Anderson

1. What are your qualifications to serve on the SECO Energy Board of Trustees?
My business life of over 50 plus years has provided me with success, upwards promotion, and tremendous managerial experience; working thirty-eight years for a major utilities manufacturing company, servicing markets worldwide. After being elected to the SECO Energy Board of Trustees I have continued my education, learning the electrical cooperative business model, completing 23 NRECA courses, earning the highest level of education Director Gold. Giving back to the community, I volunteered coaching sports and serving as president of the volunteer Fire Department. I was elected to four six-year terms on the Board of Supervisors of Warrington Township Pennsylvania. After retiring I was appointed Director of Operations for Bucks County Pennsylvania, serving a population of 650,000. I was responsible for design, construction, and opening a $150 million state of the art justice center complex located in Historic Doylestown Pennsylvania. Honorably Discharged from the United States Marine Corps.
2. How long have you been a SECO member and what do you know about the cooperative business model?
My wife Jane and I have been SECO members for eight years, residing in the Village of Belle Aire. I am serving as President and Jane as Secretary of the Belle Aire Social club allowing the opportunity to interface and make many friends. Jane and I learned that SECO Energy is the third-largest cooperative in Florida, a private business organization created and owned by the cooperative members. SECO Energy was formed and continues putting people, not profits, first which is a powerful cooperative difference with specific objectives of non-profit serving members and structured to adapt to member's changing needs. I have studied and learned the cooperative business model from top to bottom. If you have seen one cooperative you have seen one cooperative. The business model only works when the interests of the members come first.
3. In your opinion, what is the biggest challenge the energy industry will face over the next ten years?
With global population swelling and industrialization on the rise in developing nations, humanity's hunger for energy is reaching unprecedented levels. Integrating renewable energy sources and controlling counterattacks and cost containment are major issues facing our industry. I am concerned with the decline in available skills from the aging industry workforce. According to the Department of Labor, as much as 50 percent of the utility workforce will retire in the next five to ten years. I was successful in leading and encouraging the trustees to start a 4-year apprenticeship. We must find ways to provide training and opportunity to develop skill sets to build and maintain our infrastructure, to continue our standard of living. We must be committed to reducing greenhouse gases and being good stewards of the environment, without sacrificing service and reliability. This is our obligation to our children and grandchildren.
4. J.D. Power ranked SECO highest in customer satisfaction in 2015, 2016 and 2017. As a Trustee, how would you ensure continued high satisfaction?
My priority has been and will continue to encourage growth of all SECO Energy employees through training, and maintaining the current highly skilled, efficient team. I believe in open channels of communication and member satisfaction, a dedicated staff working to contain costs to prevent and minimize outages. Encouraging feedback from SECO members. I believe in empowering and challenging SECO employees to improve efficiency resulting in building a stronger diversified cooperative. I encourage member engagement and have an open-door policy for members to contact me with concerns, questions, suggestions or just meet and talk about our great cooperative. SECO Energy members are not customers, you are the owners, and you are not just number one priority, you are the reason we exist. We work for you. I pledge to continue working for you. I am asking and look forward to your continued support, representing you as your SECO District 3 Trustee.

Hamilton S. McLean

1. What are your qualifications to serve on the SECO Energy Board of Trustees?
Served as Marketing Manager – Efficiency Con-Edison – Manhattan, NY; Director-Efficiency PSE G, N.J.; State Energy State of N.H., MBA Energy Finance; Project Management Professional; Executive Director, Consumers Energy Co-op, New York.
2. How long have you been a SECO member and what do you know about the cooperative business model?
Member since May 2021; Energy supplier is Seminole Energy; generation mix includes coal, natural gas, renewables, outside purchases.
3. In your opinion, what is the biggest challenge the energy industry will face over the next ten years?
The inclusion of renewables while maintaining reliability; increasing member participation; upgrading aging infrastructure; cyber security.
4. J.D. Power ranked SECO highest in customer satisfaction in 2015, 2016 and 2017. As a Trustee, how would you ensure continued high satisfaction?
Really listening to member priorities to guide SECO future policies through expanded outreach.

David P Rovaldi

1. What are your qualifications to serve on the SECO Energy Board of Trustees?
I have been an electrical professional for over 50 years as an unlimited contractor, journeyman and apprentice. I've worked with inspectors and utility companies having built a rapport to remain in good standing with them on a professional basis. I have extensive experience in small business operations owning several businesses in different states. I have supervised two projects in excess of one-million dollars each. I currently maintain active licenses in Florida and Virginia. I have also held licenses in Maryland and Connecticut. I mentor students at Withlacoochee Technical College in the Electrical Wiring Program and the new Industrial Automation Program. I am a lifelong learner and desire to pass on my knowledge to others entering the trade. I continue attending seminars and pursue subjects of interest to me. I feel that my accumulated knowledge, business and life experiences would be an asset to the Board of Trustees if elected.
2. How long have you been a SECO member and what do you know about the cooperative business model?
I was a SECO member in the 1980s, and most recently since 2017 when I moved back to Florida in retirement. The business model is one that has grown in a rural environment providing reliable electric service to rural businesses whose main concern was to have service to run operations at a reasonable cost. The model provides its customers the opportunity to share, as a member in SECO, with a return of capital when the cooperative has a surplus of funds at the end of the fiscal year. Employees are provided ongoing training to augment their day-to-day safety and operational briefings. Well trained, safety-oriented workers keep accidents and worker compensation insurance costs down while keeping up productivity. The model also indicates that when workers come to the co-op they remain as employees for an extended tenure. I interpret this as demonstrating the employees believe they are valued and appreciated.
3. In your opinion, what is the biggest challenge the energy industry will face over the next ten years?
The electrical grid will require massive upgrades to keep up with demand for higher quality electric supplies to the sensitive electronics being employed in the market. This industry is changing rapidly. Upgrading the electrical grid will be a priority that has been ignored because utility companies were not given the incentive to modernize their infrastructure. We must invest in this or the system will fail to supply us with our future needs. When I entered the electrical profession, technologies that exist now were never even thought of in the commercial market. Now these futuristic technologies are commonplace in today's society. Just as an example, look at your mobile phone. There is more computing power in that small device than was in the first capsule launched into space. This will continue as more technologies are developed to make our lives easier, more convenient and productive.
4. J.D. Power ranked SECO highest in customer satisfaction in 2015, 2016 and 2017. As a Trustee, how would you ensure continued high satisfaction?
Follow the lead of the Trustees that came before so we can continue to maintain this high level of satisfaction. No matter how successful a system is, there is always room for improvement. These improvements must provide for: a] Improve employee productivity through ongoing training and education, b] Use what works, abandon what does not or modify it so it will work, c] Look to the employees to provide insight into how to improve the system. These are the people "in the trenches" so to speak. They know best how to do their job. They will give input as to how to make their job easier, safer and more productive if their suggestions are given a fair evaluation. It isn't always about dollars and cents. People need to come to work knowing their efforts make a difference to themselves, their families and all the members they serve.

Dr. Karrie Markland

1. What are your qualifications to serve on the SECO Energy Board of Trustees?
I have built and maintained two successful practices over the last 32 years, and I am currently practicing in my District for the last 21 years. Over the years I have been involved in the Wildwood Rotary, Sumter County Chamber, Advisory Board for the School District, sponsor numerous sporting teams and events and volunteer my time.
2. How long have you been a SECO member and what do you know about the cooperative business model?
I’ve been a SECO member since 2001. My understanding and experience with the business model is that we are member owned, nonprofit cooperative that strives for excellence in all areas of its member services through their employees and community involvement.
3. In your opinion, what is the biggest challenge the energy industry will face over the next ten years?
The biggest challenge I see is twofold in the demands of our industry (1) rapid population growth to our area has tripled (2) push for more sustainable/renewable energy can both put a strain on the customer/produce infrastructure and whether these sustainable sources can meet the demand yet continue the reliability and resiliency that our members have come to expect.
4. J.D. Power ranked SECO highest in customer satisfaction in 2015, 2016 and 2017. As a Trustee, how would you ensure continued high satisfaction?
Always keeping customers #1! Incorporate and poll customers for their feedback and changing needs. Incorporate the feedback across all touchpoints and act on these changing needs and meeting their energy goals will make for a better member experience.

Leslie Shannon Dean Wright

1. What are your qualifications to serve on the SECO Energy Board of Trustees?
I am a SECO member and resident of District 5 in Sumter County. I spent my 30-year career of public service, in adult education, law enforcement and state government. The latter part of my career was with the Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission, as the Northeast Regional Director. In this administrative position, I oversaw the regional operations in 12 counties across Central Florida, until I retired in March 2020. My experience and education (Bachelor's Degree in Criminology and Master's Degree in Adult Education) have provided me opportunities to participate, and problem solve issues, in calm and crisis situations. Honesty, integrity, accountability, communication, and common sense is what I bring to the SECO Energy Board of Trustees.
2. How long have you been a SECO member and what do you know about the cooperative business model?
I have been a SECO member since March 2014. SECO Energy is a not-for-profit electric cooperative that uses Capital Credits as its business model. SECO members are the owners of the cooperative and when available, a portion of the excess or Capital Credits are returned to the members based on the amount of energy used in previous years.
3. In your opinion, what is the biggest challenge the energy industry will face over the next ten years?
In one word, sustainability. Population growth in our state and globally, for that matter, will continue to challenge every option for energy production. There will be continued increases in fuel costs for energy production as well as costs in renewable resources such as solar and wind. SECO Energy and the other 16 electric cooperatives in Florida, advocate for providing safe, reliable, and affordable electricity, in addition to offering resources for efficient use of power in homes and businesses. We must work together as a team, through the next decade and beyond, to make every energy option affordable for all.
4. J.D. Power ranked SECO highest in customer satisfaction in 2015, 2016 and 2017. As a Trustee, how would you ensure continued high satisfaction?
As a member of SECO Energy, I am extremely proud of the work the employees do every day, in every facet of operations. There are two words that speak volumes to ensuring customer satisfaction, accountability, and responsiveness. In my 30 years of public service, answering to the public was an everyday responsibility that I took seriously. As your District 5 Trustee, I will continue being accountable and responsive to our members, to ensure customer satisfaction.

Lewis S. Smith

1. What are your qualifications to serve on the SECO Energy Board of Trustees?
43-year SECO employee – from ground man to T/D Supervisor, building construction power lines to thousands of consumers. 13 years with American Cancer Society Relay for Life in Citrus and Sumter Counties. 2 years Relay for Life Chairperson in Inverness (raised over $200,000 during those 2 years. Asst. chairman of church security team.
2. How long have you been a SECO member and what do you know about the cooperative business model?
Since January 1968. SECO is a member-owned electric utility co-op represented by Trustees they elect. Every year consumer members receive monetary returns from capital credits which reduce their bill for that month. SECO is the third largest electric co-op in the U.S. Power is supplied to SECO by Seminole Electric, a co-op owned generating plant.
3. In your opinion, what is the biggest challenge the energy industry will face over the next ten years?
Power supply. Environmentalists seek to destroy the power generation system in use today changing to solar and wind. These will not produce enough energy to supply present and future needs. California is an example of switching away from fossil fuels to “clean energy” must be carefully balanced or consumers will be subjected to blackouts.
4. J.D. Power ranked SECO highest in customer satisfaction in 2015, 2016 and 2017. As a Trustee, how would you ensure continued high satisfaction?
Continue our policies of putting consumers first through reliable service, low-cost energy, and being an example to the community as well as upgrading our entire system as needed to furnish the best possible electrical service.

Troy Creel

1. What are your qualifications to serve on the SECO Energy Board of Trustees?
Having owned and operated a successful business for more than thirty years, I am confident in taking the next step to expand my leadership skills through involvement with our SECO Energy Electric Cooperative. In addition to leadership skills gained from owning my business, the experience I received while working with the community has been invaluable. I have learned how important it is to listen. I learned how to keep an open mind, remain attentive, ask questions, pursue what I want to know and stay organized. Most importantly, I learned how to make it my business to maintain a safe and positive work environment through cooperation and team effort. Though rarely easy, I learned how to find solutions to challenges head on and be willing to step into roles I had not yet grown into.
2. How long have you been a SECO member and what do you know about the cooperative business model?
I have been a satisfied SECO member for twenty years. In the simplest terms, the cooperative business model defines a private, nonprofit organization owned by its members or customers. Electric cooperatives such as SECO are energy providers and engines of economic development that play a vital role in transforming local communities. Their principal purpose is to deliver electrical power to the members living in its service area. Members contribute to the capital of the co-op democratically and equitably electing a board of trustees to act as their voice. Members of a co-op board are members of the co-op itself. The board of trustees ensures that the co-op is working towards achieving its mission. This autonomous association unites to meet economic, social and cultural goals of its members and surrounding community.
3. In your opinion, what is the biggest challenge the energy industry will face over the next ten years?
In my opinion and from my business experience alone, employee retention will be an ongoing challenge over the next decade. Employees form the backbone of any organization. Faced with the challenges of our current and continuing economic transformations retaining highly skilled and motivated employees is essential to the stability of the co-op. The hiring and training of the workforce can be costly if turnover percentages continue to escalate. Employee incentives, competitive pay, promotions and a safe and positive work environment are key to retaining employees long term. This will reduce the costs of repetitive training and hiring processes. Since employees represent the face of the cooperative to the members they serve, the community interaction and teamwork are of upmost importance to the continuing success of the co-op.
4. J.D. Power ranked SECO highest in customer satisfaction in 2015, 2016 and 2017. As a Trustee, how would you ensure continued high satisfaction?
To ensure continued satisfaction I would work to advance community outreach through improved member interaction and education. Because co-ops are “local” energy and technology partners, customer-owned and not for profit, they are shaped by the specific needs of the communities they serve. The cooperative’s local and member driven structure is one reason they enjoy the highest customer satisfaction scores. SECO is built by and belongs to the community it serves. Additionally, the co-op is uniquely suited to meet local needs. In recent years and over time SECO has increased its efforts for community/consumer advocacy as opportunities to better one’s community is unquantifiable. Community outreach opportunities can be the most successful venue to add value to SECO membership and ensure customer satisfaction.

District Map

SECO’s service territory is divided into nine Districts.  Each District has a member-elected Trustee.  Use our interactive map to determine this by entering your service address in the color-coded map below.